MEET U.S REP. TERRI SEWELL ’86: THE FIRST AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMAN TO RECEIVE WHIG-CLIO’S JAMES MADISON AWARD

Terri Sewell is now one of the women soaring with the “first term”. Sewell was honoured by the American Whig- Cliosophic society with its highest award, The James Madison Award for Distinguished Public Service.

The congresswoman representing Alabama’s 7th congress district became the first Black woman to receive this prestigious award.

According to the American Whig- Cliosophic website, “a careful review of representative Terri Sewell’s record reveals why she is so deserving of this award”. The award team also reveals how representative Sewell continued to break down racial and gender barriers throughout her career. The congresswoman who started working as securities lawyer has exceptional leadership history even during the Obama administration.

During a virtual reception on the Daily Princetonian’s inaugural list of the most influential Princetonians in politics in early November, Terri Sewell reflected on her childhood as a little black girl who went to public school in her hometown of Selma, Alabama, her studies at Princeton, Harvard, Oxford law school to now holding important political positions.

“It was the gigantic leap both mentally and physically and geographically from Selma to Princeton. The people of Princeton, my wonderful professions, my amazing classmates and friends helped me take to,get to this journey,”she said.

The James Madison Award for Distinguished Public Service which started in 1960, is an award given to individuals who have dedicated their lives to the betterment of society. This year, the award is also celebrating its 60 years anniversary making it very exceptional for a black woman to win the award for the first time. Past winners include activities diplomats, activists, Presidents of the US, to name a few.

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